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Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui: Against Internal Colonialism

Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui: Against Internal Colonialism

Sil­via Rivera Cusi­can­qui is an Aymara activist, soci­ol­o­gist, and oral his­to­rian who has worked with indige­nous move­ments in Bolivia over the last four decades. Her work pro­vides a valu­able cri­tique of cer­tain forms of indige­nous iden­tity pol­i­tics, and a bal­ance sheet of anti­colo­nial strug­gles in the coun­try more broadly.

Policing the Crisis, Policing the Planet: an Interview with Christina Heatherton and Jordan T. Camp

Policing the Crisis, Policing the Planet: an Interview with Christina Heatherton and Jordan T. Camp

Since Occupy, many have puz­zled over the ten­dency of social move­ments, regard­less of their orig­i­nal griev­ances, to revolve around an antag­o­nism with cops and cages. In chart­ing how a range of rul­ing class strate­gies – from urban rede­vel­op­ment and the dis­ci­plin­ing of migrant labor, to impe­ri­al­ist coun­ter-insur­gency – pivot on polic­ing, this book helps explain why.

The Young Mario Tronti

The Young Mario Tronti

The rela­tion­ship between Anto­nio Gram­sci and operaismo, if occa­sion­ally men­tioned, is rarely expli­cated. And if trans­la­tions of Tronti’s 1960s writ­ings have appeared in frag­ments, his prior for­ma­tion has remained almost entirely obscured. These texts provide the reader with not only some of the ideas per­co­lat­ing in the mind of the young Tronti, but also a win­dow into the pre­his­tory of work­erism: the tumul­tuous debates within the Ital­ian left of the 1950s over the mean­ings of Marx­ism.

Some Questions around Gramsci’s Marxism (1958)

Some Questions around Gramsci’s Marxism (1958)

Cer­tainly we must assert the nov­elty, the orig­i­nal­ity, the auton­omy of Marx­ism. But the nov­elty of Marx­ism against any other phi­los­o­phy con­sists not in ask­ing more of it as a phi­los­o­phy; its orig­i­nal­ity con­sists in its offer of sci­ence to phi­los­o­phy, or rather in its con­ceiv­ing the proper phi­los­o­phy only as sci­ence, as a “speci­fic con­cep­tion of a speci­fic object.”

On Marxism and Sociology (1959)

One absolutely can­not accept that there exists a researcher who offers mate­rial to the the­o­rist, and then there is a the­o­rist who re-elab­o­rates it and pro­duces the­ory. Rather, there is a con­tin­u­ous unity real­ized already within Marx­ism, and it lives pre­cisely in the per­son of the Marx­ist.

A Living Unity in the Marxist: Introduction to Tronti’s Early Writings

A Living Unity in the Marxist: Introduction to Tronti’s Early Writings

Ulti­mately the young Tronti deter­mi­nes that what is needed now is a Marx­ism as far from phi­los­o­phy of praxis as from dialec­ti­cal mate­ri­al­ism, nei­ther a sub­jec­tivist vol­un­tarism nor an objec­tivist fatal­ism, nei­ther a purely tech­ni­cal method­ol­ogy of knowl­edge and human action nor a total­iz­ing meta­physic, but a Marx­ism that is rig­or­ous but not dog­matic, his­tor­i­cal yet not his­tori­cist, polit­i­cal as well as the­o­ret­i­cal.

Between Dialectical Materialism and Philosophy of Praxis: Gramsci and Labriola (1959)

Between Dialectical Materialism and Philosophy of Praxis: Gramsci and Labriola (1959)

First one has all of Marx revolve around Hegel, then one removes Hegel from the cen­ter and says: see, Marx fails to rotate on his own. This is how the inter­pre­ta­tion of a the­ory coin­cides with its liq­ui­da­tion. In fact pre­cisely this mis­un­der­stand­ing has dri­ven Marx’s thought to the mar­gins of con­tem­po­rary philo­soph­i­cal thought.