• The Return of Communism

    The Return of Communism

    View­point is proud to co-spon­sor the Rome Con­fer­ence on Com­mu­nism, tak­ing place in the eter­nal city from Jan­u­ary 18-22, 2017. The con­fer­ence entails a series of round­table dis­cus­sions with major fig­ures in the his­tory, prac­tice, and the­ory of com­mu­nism, as well as work­shops bring­ing together younger activists and mil­i­tants.

Lynching: A Weapon of National Oppression (1932)

Lynching: A Weapon of National Oppression (1932)

Lynch­ing: A Weapon of National Oppres­sion reminds us of an ear­lier gen­er­a­tion of rad­i­cals who disiden­ti­fied with lib­eral cap­i­tal­ist democ­racy and Amer­i­can excep­tion­al­ism to envi­sion an end to impe­rial dom­i­na­tion and eco­nomic exploita­tion. The pam­phlet and the multi-racial strug­gles against legal lynch­ing that inspired it are impor­tant tools as we heed renewed calls for black self-deter­mi­na­tion amidst a global reasser­tion of fas­cism and lynch law.

White Purity

White Purity

Among other things, white­ness is a kind of solip­sism. From right to left, whites con­sis­tently and suc­cess­fully reroute every polit­i­cal dis­cus­sion to their iden­tity.

The Safety Pin and the Swastika

The Safety Pin and the Swastika

If you had read in early 2016 about a National Pol­icy Insti­tute con­fer­ence on the theme of “Iden­tity Pol­i­tics,” you might have assumed it was an inno­cent gath­er­ing of pro­gres­sives. If you had attended, you would have been in for an unpleas­ant sur­prise. The National Pol­icy Insti­tute is an orga­ni­za­tion of white nation­al­ists, over­seen by neo-Nazi media dar­ling Richard Spencer.

Feedback

Feedback

It once was com­mon prac­tice for rad­i­cal jour­nals to solicit feed­back from their read­ers. It anchored the­o­ret­i­cal devel­op­ments and pointed to new areas of inquiry. As View­point expands its work, we hope our read­ers can help us revive the prac­tice here.

Cuba Libre (1960)

Cuba Libre (1960)

On July 21st, 1960, LeRoi Jones, later known as Amiri Baraka, vis­ited Cuba with a remark­able group of eleven intel­lec­tu­als and activists, includ­ing Robert Williams, Harold Cruse, John Hen­rik Clarke, and Sarah Wright.

Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui: Against Internal Colonialism

Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui: Against Internal Colonialism

Sil­via Rivera Cusi­can­qui is an Aymara activist, soci­ol­o­gist, and oral his­to­rian who has worked with indige­nous move­ments in Bolivia over the last four decades. Her work pro­vides a valu­able cri­tique of cer­tain forms of indige­nous iden­tity pol­i­tics, and a bal­ance sheet of anti­colo­nial strug­gles in the coun­try more broadly.

Policing the Crisis, Policing the Planet: an Interview with Christina Heatherton and Jordan T. Camp

Policing the Crisis, Policing the Planet: an Interview with Christina Heatherton and Jordan T. Camp

Since Occupy, many have puz­zled over the ten­dency of social move­ments, regard­less of their orig­i­nal griev­ances, to revolve around an antag­o­nism with cops and cages. In chart­ing how a range of rul­ing class strate­gies – from urban rede­vel­op­ment and the dis­ci­plin­ing of migrant labor, to impe­ri­al­ist coun­ter-insur­gency – pivot on polic­ing, this book helps explain why.

The Young Mario Tronti

The Young Mario Tronti

The rela­tion­ship between Anto­nio Gram­sci and operaismo, if occa­sion­ally men­tioned, is rarely expli­cated. And if trans­la­tions of Tronti’s 1960s writ­ings have appeared in frag­ments, his prior for­ma­tion has remained almost entirely obscured. These texts provide the reader with not only some of the ideas per­co­lat­ing in the mind of the young Tronti, but also a win­dow into the pre­his­tory of work­erism: the tumul­tuous debates within the Ital­ian left of the 1950s over the mean­ings of Marx­ism.

Final Remarks

Final Remarks

My wagers are these: that the riot can now be thought as a fun­da­men­tal form of class strug­gle rather than an impo­lit­i­cal spasm; that we can rec­og­nize in this the ascend­ing sig­nif­i­cance of sur­plus pop­u­la­tions within the dialec­ti­cal pro­duc­tion of capital’s antag­o­nists; and that the riot can be in turn seen as a sun­dial indi­cat­ing where we are within the his­tory of cap­i­tal­ist accu­mu­la­tion.