Workers’ Inquiry

Workers' Inquiry: A Genealogy

Workers’ Inquiry: A Genealogy

In 1880, La Revue social­is­te asked an aging Karl Marx to draft a ques­tion­naire to be cir­cu­lat­ed among the French work­ing class. Called “A Work­ers’ Inquiry,” it was a list of exact­ly 101 detailed ques­tions, inquir­ing about every­thing from meal times to wages to lodg­ing.

Introduction to L'operaio americano (1954)

Introduction to L’operaio americano (1954)

There exists an Amer­i­ca that no one talks about, which is to be found beyond the myth of the refrig­er­a­tor, the auto­mo­bile, and the tele­vi­sion, and beyond the myth of afflu­ence for all. It is the Amer­i­ca of the fac­to­ry: an unknown Amer­i­ca whose his­to­ry is made of strikes, exploita­tion, and pro­le­tar­i­an mis­ery.

Introduction to L'ouvrier américain (1949)

Introduction to L’ouvrier américain (1949)

We present here an unprece­dent­ed doc­u­ment of great val­ue about the lives of Amer­i­can work­ers. This appraisal stems not only from the fact that it defin­i­tive­ly puts paid to both the absurd claim that Amer­i­can work­ers don’t have class con­scious­ness, and the myth of the com­fort and lux­u­ry of the Amer­i­can pro­le­tari­at.

Coresearch and Counter-Research: Romano Alquati’s Itinerary Within and Beyond Italian Radical Political Thought

Coresearch and Counter-Research: Romano Alquati’s Itinerary Within and Beyond Italian Radical Political Thought

The per­son­al, polit­i­cal and intel­lec­tu­al itin­er­ary of Romano Alquati was inex­tri­ca­bly bound up with Ital­ian post­war his­to­ry, when a gen­er­a­tion of mil­i­tants rel­e­gat­ed the impor­tance of their own pro­fes­sion to sec­ond place, seek­ing instead jobs that could sup­port their polit­i­cal com­mit­ment. In doing so, they cre­at­ed a new way of “being-polit­i­cal” that would prove to be a water­shed for suc­ces­sive gen­er­a­tions, up to the present day.

Towards a History of the Professional: On the Class Composition of the Research University

Towards a History of the Professional: On the Class Composition of the Research University

The intro­duc­tion of research into the mis­sion of high­er edu­ca­tion, a trans­for­ma­tion which took place first in Ger­many and Scot­land, had pro­found and last­ing effects; prin­ci­pal among them was pro­vid­ing a means by which fac­ul­ty in the Unit­ed States (where the state was far weak­er than it was in Europe) could pro­fes­sion­al­ize, orga­nize, and cre­ate a new insti­tu­tion­al form – a hybrid of Euro­pean and US high­er edu­ca­tion now hailed as the Amer­i­can Research Uni­ver­si­ty.

Proletarian Experience (1952)

Proletarian Experience (1952)

The pro­le­tariat is the real respon­se to this eco­nomic pseudo-mate­ri­al­ism. Its respon­se is elab­o­rated through its prac­ti­cal exis­tence. Any­one who looks at its his­tory can see that the pro­le­tariat has not mere­ly react­ed to def­i­nite, exter­nal eco­nomic fac­tors (degree of exploita­tion, stan­dard of liv­ing, mode of con­cen­tra­tion), but that it has real­ly act­ed.

Outline of a Pamphlet on FIAT (1967)

Outline of a Pamphlet on FIAT (1967)

We suc­cinct­ly present here the out­line of one of the pub­li­ca­tions with which, in the near future, we’ll trans­late direct­ly into the­o­ret­i­cal-strate­gic work some of the find­ings that have been sur­fac­ing for years with a con­tin­u­al prac­ti­cal-polit­i­cal pres­ence, years of tac­ti­cal sur­veys of the ter­rain of class war. We’re choos­ing again a nodal point: once again, FIAT, “class com­po­si­tion at FIAT.”