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Is the Party Over?

Is the Party Over?

The occu­pa­tions move­ment is highly struc­tured, and this struc­ture is a focal point for polit­i­cal debates. Deci­sions are made by the gen­eral assem­bly (GA) through a process of demo­c­ra­tic delib­er­a­tion; it also serves as the basis for the del­e­ga­tion respon­si­bil­i­ties and tasks, which are required both to keep peo­ple par­tic­i­pat­ing and to orga­nize polit­i­cal activ­ity.

Two, Three, Many Oaklands?

Two, Three, Many Oaklands?

All eyes are on Oak­land. And right­fully so. Oak­land has shown the other occu­pa­tions how the move­ment can be suc­cess­fully esca­lated. By trans­form­ing the occu­pa­tion of a park into a gen­eral strike, Oak­land has indis­putably emerged as the most mil­i­tant sec­tion of the national occu­pa­tion move­ment. All the other occu­pa­tions across the county are ask­ing them­selves how they can fol­low in its foot­steps. But, as strange as it may sound, the best way to repro­duce the level of mil­i­tancy that has erupted in Oak­land may actu­ally be to not fol­low in that city’s foot­steps.

Notes on Oakland 2011

Notes on Oakland 2011

We expect his­tory to provide us with expla­na­tions – to place the imme­di­acy of expe­ri­ence within a wider story whose terms will be pro­gres­sively elab­o­rated and illu­mi­nated. Polit­i­cal action, which aims at inter­ven­ing into his­tory and alter­ing its move­ment, has an entirely dif­fer­ent kind of truth – a sub­jec­tive truth pro­duced in the act of par­tic­i­pat­ing.

The General Strike: An Incomplete Bibliography for Ambivalent Occupiers

The General Strike: An Incomplete Bibliography for Ambivalent Occupiers

Occupy Oakland’s call for a day-long gen­eral strike on Novem­ber 2 has revived inter­est in the tac­tic, calls for which were also heard over the win­ter in Madison, Wis­con­sin. Yet the gen­eral strike is prac­ti­cally unknown today in the United States, func­tion­ing more as a rhetor­i­cal index of mil­i­tancy than a seri­ous pro­posal for uni­fied action. In sol­i­dar­ity with this movement’s pro­found rup­ture in polit­i­cal lan­guage, we’ve selected a few impor­tant moments in the his­tory of the con­cept to illus­trate its poten­tial direc­tions.

Critical Refusals: Angela Davis at Occupy Philadelphia

Critical Refusals: Angela Davis at Occupy Philadelphia

The Inter­na­tional Her­bert Mar­cuse Soci­ety held its fourth bien­nial con­fer­ence at the Uni­ver­sity of Penn­syl­va­nia. A mix of aca­d­e­mics and activists, the con­fer­ence rep­re­sented yet another attempt to con­nect the two worlds. What bet­ter way than to have Angela Davis her­self – renowned intel­lec­tual, renowned com­mu­nist – share her thoughts with us on a chilly Fri­day night.

Oakland

Oakland

A gen­eral strike has been declared by the Oak­land Gen­eral Assem­bly. The orig­i­nal ver­sion of this song was the num­ber one hit dur­ing the 1946 Oak­land Gen­eral Strike.

The Prince and the Pauper

Every­one on the left has pointed out that the riots in Lon­don are rooted in capital’s assault on the work­ing class, couched in the ide­o­log­i­cal lan­guage of aus­ter­ity – and that this was the kin­dling sparked by the racist police bru­tal­ity that cul­mi­nated in the mur­der of Mark Dug­gan. But our task – like Marx’s task, when he defended the vio­lent upheaval of the Sile­sian weavers – isn’t to give a moral eval­u­a­tion of the riots, like school­mas­ters dili­gently stack­ing the pros against the cons, but, rather, to grasp their speci­fic char­ac­ter.